Women’s Fashion Clothes For 2010

When it comes to women’s fashion, clothes for 2010 are definitely taking the limelight. Promising to be one of the most colorful and creative years for the fashion world, designers this year are already breaking rules and starting new trends.

On the other hand, men’s fashion is taking a step back, with designers sticking to basics. When it comes to basics, it’s the men’s department that stocks up more as compared to the women’s; fashion, clothes, and shoes that are more on the adventurous side focus a little more on women than men nowadays.

This begs the question, why do women’s fashion clothes show more changes as compared to the opposite gender’s? Perhaps designers know better than to trifle with men’s clothes; after all, the average Joe is not about to experiment with pants of a shape that looks foreign to him. Women, in contrast, are more willing to explore new trends.

Thankfully, in terms of women’s fashion, clothes are becoming more and more figure-friendly. In the last few years, women’s fashion clothes included baby doll dresses, maxi dresses, loose shirts, and many other trends that flatter a woman the right way. Any unwanted pounds are well-hidden while beautiful curves are given due merit. Designers have gone a long way in designing wearable, chic women’s fashion clothes.

The year 2010 is no different. More ensembles are cropping up, with women becoming more open to new styles and cuts. Women’s fashion clothes are being overhauled; as a result, dress codes are becoming more and more open to imagination. The word “casual chic” can mean anything from pants and heels to a fun, short dress. Women’s fashion & clothes are rather unpredictable with every year that passes by, but this change is something fashionistas actually look forward to every season.

Perhaps men’s fashion will get a makeover soon, but not as radically as women’s fashion – clothes, shoes, and bags will always be more prone to modification on a woman’s body. There will still be great designers banking on women’s basics, such as Calvin Klein and DKNY; however, with savants like Alexander McQueen not holding back, there is more to come in women’s fashion clothes for 2010.

Comme Des Garcons – A Global Fashion Brand

Comme des Garcons means ‘like the boys’ in French. This fashion label is the creation of the amazing Japanese designer Rei Kawakubo, who has made her mark on the fashion world with her own brand of controversial fashion despite having no formal fashion or tailoring training.

Perhaps it is this lack of training that has enabled Rei to create designs that have caused such a huge stir in the fashion world. She has challenged the notion that fashion must be sexy and colourful . She created designs of clothing that are described by some as avant garde by some. In the eighties, she created her vision of fashion in all black clothing that was almost revolutionary at the time. The technical side of Comme des Garcons is handled completely by her pattern makers who are challenged with transforming her designs into reality. The Comme de Garcons label has it’s own very recognisable signature look. The clothing is assymetical and draped across the body in an almost masculine style and feature details such as fraying and holes.

More recent Comme Des Garcon collections have incorporated loud and garish colours but for spring summer 09 Rei has returned to her favourite black.

The label was extablished in 1969 and has since been instrumental in bringing other new talents into the fashion spot light including Junya Watanabe and Tao Kurihara who have both started sub label under the Comme Des Garcons name . The label has also expanded into a huge empire over the last four decades with stores all over the globe and both clothing and perfume lines.

GHD – Is it a Billion Dollar Global Fashion Brand?

The rise and rise of GHD is becoming an ever more impressive story. Despite being ultimately a one-product company (the iconic ghd hair straightener, albeit it in various sizes and colours), and despite (or perhaps because of) being headquartered in deeply unfashionable Silsdon in Yorkshire, UK, GHD seems to get as many mentions in the fashion press as a certain Mrs Beckham.

Monique Lhullier, Miss Sixty and many others featured GHD as their haircare partner at their recent Fashion Week shows, with wavy, sea-inspired styles that showed off the versatility of the ghd iv styler.

Perhaps even more importantly the GHD marketing and PR machine that was so effective in dominating the UK market for GHD, is now fully up and running on a global basis with the famous pink GHD promotion now appearing across the globe (with a global network of breast cancer charities benefiting). Other campaigns like the GHD Pure / GHD Dark promotion also enjoyed global promotion

further example of how GHD is becoming a genuine international fashion brand is the unwelcome arrival of large-scale counterfeiting of GHD products. Indeed, major UK-based discount beauty and cosmetics chain, Superdrug, recently admitted supplying its customers with counterfeit GHD hair straighteners, albeit unintentionally [Source: BBC News Website, Friday, 19 September 2008]. This would suggest that GHD counterfeiting is now highly organised and very professional (as it is with designer perfumes and luxury fashion accessories). Of course, no-one at GHD will be happy with fake GHD products being sold, but it does bracket the company in some pretty exclusive company (Gucci, Prada, and the like).

It would appear that GHD have realised from the start that building a fashion brand is not exclusively about sales figures. Turnover, although important, must be conducive to brand building. For that reason, GHD have a famous reputation for refusing to supply to high street names – culminating in rejecting likes of Boots when GHD themselves were only a few years old. Although this policy has been relaxed slightly in recent years (with Boots and Amazon starting to sell directly supplied GHD hair straighteners in the last 12 months), it helped create the exclusivity and allure that any brand needs if it is to become a significant asset in its own right.

Which brings us to the issue of how much GHD might ultimately be worth. When the most recent management buy-out took place last year (just before the global credit markets seized up), the valuation was around $288 million ($160m). One of the reasons given for injecting capital a that stage into the business was to help it strike out around the globe to boost its presence and revenues from the US, Europe and Australasia. Achieving this, particularly in the US, where it was previously an underground cult brand, will certainly see the valuation of the GHD brand soar.

Of course, now isn’t the time to get carried away with valuing privately-held companies, but once the markets have returned to normality in 2010 or thereabouts, and provided that GHD has managed to continue to build its presence globally, then there is no reason why the people of Yorkshire won’t be celebrating the presence of a billion dollar fashion brand just up t’road.