7 Reasons Fashion Brands Should Be Nice to Bloggers

In the fashion world bloggers are rising to prominence as a force to be reckoned with. For some reason many new and established fashion brands still seem to treat them as second class citizens. We think this is a mistake, and here are a few reasons why we think so.

1. 40% of the press at New York Fashion Week are bloggers.

According to Reuters the presence of online media at fashion week has grown more than 20% over the last six months. This means that of the 3, 600 members of press present, nearly 40% are fashion bloggers.

2. Major fashion brands are inviting them to shows.

Designers like Carl Lagerfeld and John Galliano are inviting bloggers to their shows. In some cases they are even paying all costs to fly the bloggers to the show. If top end designers are doing this, don’t you think it’s time you start being nice to your local fashion blogger?

3. In the USA fashion bloggers are becoming very popular.

Blogs like Style Bubble are getting up to 25 000 hits a day. While some bloggers have tens of thousands of twitter followers. If this isn’t enough to make you sit up and notice then I don’t know what is.

4. Bloggers are now judges for CFDA

For the first time ever bloggers have been invited to be judges for the Council of Fashion Designers of America. This is a landmark event for the fashion blogging industry. It is an indicator of the power and influence that is moving into the hands of fashion bloggers.

5. Traditional fashion editors are losing control.

Just like the film and music industry is struggling to come to grips with the fact that the internet has made them largely irrelevant; the fashion editorial industry is losing much of it’s power. In the good (or bad depending on your point of view) old days fashion editors could control what and who the public sees. With the advent of the internet and growth of fashion blogs this power is now gone.

6. Enthusiasm = Influence

Everybody knows that the thing that sells clothes is enthusiasm and passion; not knowledge. The average person out there doesn’t care about technical details and high-brow descriptions of the “silhouette” and “architectural lines” of a garment. On the other hand, having somebody who clearly loves clothes recommend an item they love carries much more weight. Bloggers mostly do this because they love clothes and fashion, yes some of them make money from their blogs, but they only make money because they are passionate about what they do.

7. The rest of the world lags behind the USA

If you are based outside the USE this might be the most important reason to start building relationships with local bloggers. The developing world runs 3-4 years behind the states when it comes to the adoption of internet trends. This means that before long all the major local brands will be beating a path to the door of your favorite blogger. Shouldn’t you be there first?

2015 May Be the Year to Try Out New Fashion Brands

If you have been paying attention to the US national spending trends on clothing since 2011 you will notice that there has been some interesting changes in how the US, along with the rest of the world, shops for clothing. According to the US Department of Labor Statistics the Average Annual expenditures on Apparel shopping had been declining steadily since the 2011 annual average of $1,740 to a low point in 2013 annual average of $1,604, but in mid-2014 US apparel spending bounced back to annual average of $1,706 and is expected to continue to increase. During those same years a rebound trend was noticed in US made clothing which resulted in a 6.2% increase in sales.

Along with that The American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) President and CEO Juanita D. Duggan announced in January/2015, “apparel and footwear contributed a record $361 billion to the U.S. economy in 2013, a bigger contribution than new cars, alcohol, toys, or practically any other industry.”

So what does all this mean exactly? Are we spending less but now have more clothes? Is the American clothing manufacturing industry back on top? Well not really, even with the record breaking increase 97% of all apparel sold in the US is still imported. What it does mean is that consumers are out there spending again and are buying more products. The recession mixed things up in all industries and as we continue to bounce back from it, more and more fashion trends get moved around in the mix. A new economy brings in new opportunities for new ideas, new brands and new designs to enter the picture.

But was this shifting in the fashion industry by accident or by design? Interestingly enough in early June/2015 during an agricultural forum held by the World Trade Organization the US accused China for the surging polyester content of wardrobes the world over as they claimed China has been stockpiling huge amounts of cotton for years which has led to “an increase in the use of polyester to the detriment of all cotton-producing countries.”

Other accusations said were that China is paying out huge subsidies to its cotton sector, about $5.1 billion in the 2013-2014 growing season. Between these outlays and its stockpiling, China is causing cotton prices to plunge on the international market altogether.

But is that the only reason prices have fallen? Maybe not, as China also cut back on its cotton imports which left much more cotton for the rest of the world to purchase and they also improved their polyester’s quality over the years thanks to declining oil prices, which would make polyester cheaper as China exports massive amounts of.

So what does this mean for the consumer? Well regardless of the country relations there is one thing that is evident, as clothing materials have gotten cheaper the quality for lesser known brands have gotten better. This has opened up the door for other international countries to sell their products to world consumers, such as the small up trend of the South American ‘Butt-lift’ jeans, which have found a market in Canada, Australia and certain parts of the US.

Another trend that has been seen is lesser known brands have benefitted from this quality increase which allows them to openly compete with bigger brands. Smaller brands also experienced a large growth in Google searches between mid-2014 and mid-2015 like; Cello Jeans (68% average search increase in 12 months), GJG Denim (31% average search increase in 12 months), Flying Monkey Jeans (86% average search increase in 12 months) and Silver Diva Jeans (24% average search increase in 12 months).

So what are you waiting for? Try a new bold or fierce brand today and open up your wardrobe to the new Fashion possibilities as 2015 promises to be the year of fashion trend changes.

Levi’s – Fashion Brand or Denim Icon?

Denim icon. There are a multitude of fashion brands in the market, especially in the jeans market, however none achieve the iconic status and brand salience as Levi’s. The fortified and unique image of the Levi’s brand allows them to not only be the most recognised but dominate the jeans market from markedly more expensive competitors. Levi’s can be mentioned in the same breath as Diesel, Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein and Evisu, and in certain parts of the world they are considered a luxury brand; in southern Europe and parts of Asia and South America they are regularly preferred to designer labels.

An icon imbues legendary, revolutionary, original and unique qualities that are fully recognised and accepted by a large audience. An icon is a revered figurehead that is truly respected and regarded as a leader of their element. An icon that effuses a heritage of innovation and originality through 150 years of social and economic change and still remains at the vanguard of its field becomes a personality and a part of one’s life.

On a global scale people look to Levi’s for authenticity, originality and dependability, in other words they see it as the ‘real deal’. Worldwide Levi’s is accepted as an American icon, an idea furthered by creative images of ‘the jeans that built America’ and the global audience put their trust into the Levi’s ‘institution’ that embodies history, innovation and expertise.

As one would expect from a leader, Levi’s justifies its iconic image by their hand in consistently setting new trends, re-designing the marketplace and raising the benchmark for quality and satisfying consumers’ needs. Respect is not earned cheaply, and an icon is nothing without it. Levi’s through their values in integrity, empathy and courage have ventured and developed a high ethical conduct and social responsibility; observed from the 1960 Levi’s integrated southern plant, the positive representation in their advertising of older, disabled, black and ethnic people, through to the Community Involvement Teams and the Levi Strauss Foundation. These initiatives are not overlooked by the socially and ethically aware audience that now exists and thus the worldwide respect and trust put into Levi’s is regularly consolidated.

Another fact that confirms Levi’s iconic status is its longevity in remaining the most popular and respected denim brand that people want to be associated with. The history illustrates this: the 1950s Hollywood movies depicting the ‘biker boys’ cool image, the 70s Levi’s wearing ‘Saturday Night Fever Culture’, clothing the U.S Olympic team and the ‘Blues 501’ popularity in the 80s, and the cutting-edge unforgettable communications of the 90s up to the current day. Original creative ideas like ‘Laundrette’, ‘Flat Eric’, ‘Clayman’, ‘Twist’ and ‘Odyssey’ represent milestones in solidifying the global Levi’s appeal and raising its position up on a pedestal, akin to the status of an icon.

Endorsed by history and consolidated by the unique encapsulating imagery and communication by the advertising medium, Levi’s has ceased to be a mere fashion brand and has become an international symbol of continuous innovation, quality and dependability. Henceforth considering the range of appeal, from cowboys to skaters, and the depth of its global status, it remains very difficult not to accept Levi’s as the denim icon.